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Metropolis, Delaware is world class city on par with New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, and Kuala Lumpur. It has a staggering 7 million people, making it the second largest city in the United States behind New York. The metropolitan area carries many more.

Geographically, the Big Apricot is made out of 6 boroughs: New Troy, Park Ridge, Bakerline, St. Martin's Island, Hell's Gate, and Queensland Park. Half of the boroughs are islands: New Troy is bordered by Hobbs River to the north and the West River to the west and south. St. Martin's Island and Hell's Gate are islands in the Delaware Bay, which borders Metropolis to the East.

Frank Berkowitz is the mayor of Metropolis and has been for the last 12 years. He's currently beginning his fourth term and has overseen the largest economic expansion in Metropolis history. The budget currently operates at a 12 percent surplus which is then doled out to new projects the city council desires to better the city. The streets are the cleanest in America. The schools, even in Suicide Slum, are the best public schools in the nation. Income for workers is extremely high, while cost of living is relatively low among the cities along the Eastern seaboard. Metropolis is routinely the winner of "Best Place in America to Live" because of its family friendly neighborhoods, decent weather, and its educational and economical opportunities.

Delaware Bay
The large blue expanse of the Delaware Bay separates two of America's most important cities. To the southwest lies Metropolis, Delaware, the City of Tomorrow. At the northeastern tip of the bay is Gotham, an American relic. Farther northward up into the Delaware River lies Philadelphia, PA and Wilmington, DE.
Park Ridge
Park Ridge was originally a completely separate town back until the late 1800s when citizens began to desire some of the amenities afforded to Metropolitan residents. It is thus a blend between the old and the new and has very much its own colonial. Park Ridge is home to the final northern and western stops on the Monorail. Commuters into New Troy cross over the Hobbs River and enter the island from the northwest.

Park Ridge is also home to the Metropolis Sharks. Originally the Sharks played in New Troy, but when building a new stadium in 2010, team owners found Park Ridge easier for parking and far less expensive in land costs.

  • Field of Tomorrow:
         The Field of Tomorrow represents its name in every way. Built in 2010, the stadium is home to the Metropolis Sharks and is a venue for other sporting events and concerts of every genre. The Field, as it is known, has a retractable roof, grass playing surface, room for 90,000 fans, a pair of the largest jumbotrons in the league, almost any perk a fan could want.
         What would be nice is a trophy. The Sharks have not won a championship, despite routinely being a playoff team.
Bakerline
Sitting at the northern end of the 6 Metropolitan boroughs, Bakerline is home to many middle class working families who often commute into New Troy. Aside from Monarch Field, this middle class, residential community is also home to Metropolis' Naval Yard. The Metropolis Monorail runs south out of Bakerline and into New Troy to help deter traffic congestion.
  • Monarch's Field:
         Monarch Field is one of the most prestigious fields in all of baseball and home to the aptly named Metropolis Monarchs. When it was first built, in 1917, it was the largest stadiums in all of baseball. Since those days it has undergone four major renovations and combines the nostalgic baseball feel with the modern amenities associated with newer ballparks.
  • Hampstead:
         Located on the northern outskirts of Bakerline, Hampstead is a pleasant family-oriented suburb of Metropolis. The streets are tree-lined, and one might expect to see kids with a lemonade stand on a corner in the summer.
St. Martin's Island
St. Martin's Island is the most posh and pristine of the boroughs. Affordable only by the wealthy, St. Martin's is shrouded in forests with small pockets for mansions. While the Monorail does not have a stop out here, there are a pair of automobile bridges that make the large island accessible.
  • Griffin Observatory:
         The Griffin Observatory has been a leader in telescopic scientific exploration since the 1940s and the structure stands as the lone object on the St. Martin's Skyline. Scientists regularly release some of the remarkable photography taken from the most powerful telescope on the planet.
West River
The West River flows in from mainland Delaware and splits at New Troy where it connects with Hobbs River to the north. The rest of the river continues to the south and spills out past the many islands of Metropolis and out into the Delaware Bay.
  • S.I.A. Dam:
         A large hydroelectric dam facility that helps power Metropolis' gargantuan electric needs.
New Troy
The island of New Troy is one of the most well known places in the world. The skyline is easily recognizable with its plethora of skyscrapers and waterways of the Hobbs River to the north and the West River to the south and west. To the east lies the Delaware Bay. A maze of bridgework for roads and for the Metropolis Monorail splays out like a spider's web, connecting New Troy in every direction. It is known for its bustling and vibrant community. The Big Apricot is one of America's jewels.
  • Glenmorgan Square :
         Extremely large billboards and television screens dominate this area, which is hub for shopping for Metropolis. News and stock prices slide along holographic marquees underneath the Monorail which slips silently by. News anchors, models, and sports stars pop up on the large screens sometimes trying to inform you, but seemingly always trying to sell you something. At night, there are so many lights that on the ground it looks almost like day. During the holiday season, the area is almost impassable with foot traffic.
  • Hypersector:
         The Hypersector is home to some of the most powerful and successful businesses in the whole world. Skyscrapers are everywhere in this city, but the most concentrated area is right here. In the 1920s the Emporer Building was built and, at the time, was the highest tower in America. In the 50s, the Daily Planet tower was erected. Though smaller, the building is known for it's large golden globe that sits atop it. Finally, in the 1990s, LuthorCorp built the tallest building in all of Metropolis, and on the East Coast, in fact.
  • Chinatown:
         This area was settled by Chinese immigrants after the turn of the previous century and the neighborhood's residents made a concerted effort to maintain their culture. The results is a hustling and bustling business area with many nice eateries and small shoppes.
  • Little Bohemia :
         Little Bohemia is home to the arts community of Metropolis. Chic art galleries and restaurants with higly priced food and extremely small portions mix in with coffee shops and novelty bars. The area is home to Metropolis' Museum of Art, one of the most famous in the nation.
  • Midtown:
         Midtown Metropolis is a mixture of busy corporate skyscrapers, open green space, residential districts, and governmental and service facilities. This area is littered with large trees that give shade in the summertime and mixes the feel of big city with the outdoors.
  • Centennial Park:
         Nearly 800 acres in the northwestern portion of New Troy is devoted to Centennial Park. The park gives residents a large open space in which to congregate or enjoy the outdoors. Activities such as running and frisbee are very popular here in the warm months, though running and walking take place here year round. Sometimes the atmosphere is so serene that one might forget they're in the middle of the second largest city in America.
  • Suicide Slum:
         Sometime after the rusting of American manufacturing, the Suicide Slum took a turn for the worse. Facotries left, but with nowhere to go the workers stayed. Unemployment is high here, as is the crime rate. This is the part of Metropolis that residents fail to mention, the place that captialism forgot.
  • Union Station:
         Union Station is where the regular railways as well as the Monorailways for the city all join. It sits on 3 different floors and is a confusing web of transit and commotion as commuters try to get from one spot to the next. High white archways are connected by marble tiles or marble stairwells. Every so often a soothing, computerized female voice gives updates over the loudspeaker.
Hell's Gate
Hell's Gate sounds much worse than it really is. Sure, this neighborhood is one of the rougher ones in Metropolis, but it is still very safe compared to most city's standards.

The name derives from the treacherous waters awaiting ships as they make their way up the Delaware towards Philadelphia. Like Queensland Park, it has an extremely high immigrant population and has a dense population. The Monorail extends to the east out here, where it ends on the Blue line.

Stryker's Island
Stryker's Island is a tiny island out in the Delaware Bay and is home to the Delaware Penitentiary. The island is only accessible by water.
  • Stryker's Island Penitentiary:
         The Stryker's Island Penitentiary is one of the most modern incarceration facilities in the world. The security system and facilities are state of the art. Administrators are specifically chosen based on the goals of the facility. The State of Delaware has chosen to place a higher value on rehabilitation rather than retribution. Therefore, there are a plethora of training activities and amenities for the prisoners. It is often derided in the public for being a country club prison.
Hell's Gate
Hell's Gate sounds much worse than it really is. Sure, this neighborhood is one of the rougher ones in Metropolis, but it is still very safe compared to most city's standards.

The name derives from the treacherous waters awaiting ships as they make their way up the Delaware towards Philadelphia. Like Queensland Park, it has an extremely high immigrant population and has a dense population. The Monorail extends to the east out here, where it ends on the Blue line.

Route 16
Route 16 cuts across Delaware from Metropolis towards Chesapeake Bay, passing Holly Oak Creek Park, the Delaware State Fairgrounds, and the Hall of Justice.



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